BOARD MENU

AIRLINE
Cage Free eggs
Details
Austrian Airlines
Partly
Fly Niki
Partly
Air France
No
Brussels Airlines
No
Swiss
Partly
Edelweiss
Partly
Lufthansa
Partly

ARE CAGE EGGS HIDDEN IN
YOUR IN-FLIGHT MENU?

Travelling by plane is exciting, but also tiring. After going through the security check and waiting at the gate for the plane to take off, you are likely most happy when you can finally board the plane and travel to your destination. To help travel time fly by and keep everyone fed and therefore in a good mood, airlines usually offer various snacks or meals on long flights. Unfortunately this food very often comes with animal suffering - i.e. they contain eggs from hens kept in battery cages..

airplane1

 

Airlines will do what they can to make you feel comfortable on their flights…

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CAMPAIGN

How do the laying hens live who provide the eggs for omelets, cookies, and cakes in the in-flight menus?
Time for an airline #eggcheck!

Airlines serve thousands of meals to passengers every day. Most airlines are still using cage eggs in the meals and snacks they offer you. While traditional battery cages have been banned in the European Union since 2012, the so called “enriched cages” are still very common, and in the United States and many other countries around the world battery cages are the norm. In battery cages, hens spend their entire lives in a tiny wire cage that only allows each hen little more than an iPad’s worth of individual space to move around in.

In Europe, almost 56% of egg-laying hens spend their entire lives in enriched cages – that number jumps to more than 90% for hens living in battery cages in the US. When airlines choose cage-free eggs (especially those from free-range farming and organic farming), they support a farming system that gives laying hens a better life by meeting their basic needs such as movement, nesting, scratching, and stretching their wings. This is why FOUR PAWS calls for an #eggcheck and asks airlines to go cage-free.

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koka new

HANNAH HEN

Hannah is on an #eggcheck mission to investigate where airlines get their eggs. She wants to find out if airlines are using cage eggs in their in-flight meals and snacks.

Hannah the hen was raised on a free-range farm. However recently, she learned that most of her fellow laying hens do not live in the outdoors like she does but rather in closed, indoor only buildings and in crowded cages. She was shocked and saddened, but also determined to help. Hannah wants to find out which airlines are using eggs from cage-keeping systems and convince them to ask for eggs from farms that do not keep their laying hens in cages.

Her #eggcheck mission has already begun. As summer is a busy season for travelling Hannah decided to investigate airlines.

Find out more about her investigation here and help her convince airlines to serve only cage-free eggs on their flights.

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INVESTI-GATE

Is the airline you are flying on using cage eggs or cage-free eggs?
Find out here and help Hannah in asking airlines to use only cage-free eggs.

Some airlines have started serving cage-free eggs on certain flight routes they take. In the U.S., this also applies to the designated class of service, with cage-free eggs being served in first/business class but not in economy class. Here Hannah presents the findings from her #eggcheck mission. You can find out whether different airlines’ national, continental, or inter-continental flights (referred to as domestic or international flights in the US) use cage or cage-free eggs here.

STATUS

green content cage-free

yellow contentpartially cage-free

red contentcage eggs or no response from airline

red contentno eggs served/not applicable to campaign

ROUTES

Airlines often work with different local caterers and products depending on the routes they are taking, which is why the status of airlines is also presented according to routes. In the US, domestic flights include both national and continental flights, and intercontinental is the same as international.

NATIONAL (N): national flights are those leaving from the airline’s headquarter country

CONTINENTAL (C): continental flights are those within the continent of the airline’s headquarter country

INTERCONTINENTAL (I): intercontinental flights are those that cross continents

BOARD MENU

Airline
CAGE FREE EGGS
PROGRESS
Status
Details
Austrian Airlines
Partly
N C I
Fly Niki
Partly
N C I
Air France
No
N C I
no response
Brussels Airlines
No
N C I
Swiss
Partly
N C I
Edelweiss
Partly
N C I
checking
Lufthansa
Partly
N C I
Germanwings
Partly
N C I
Eurowings
Partly
N C I
Condor
Partly
N C I
TUIfly
Partly
N C I
Air Berlin
Partly
N C I
Air Charters Europe
No
N C I
no eggs
AIS Airlines
No
N C I
no eggs
Arkefly TUI Niederlande
No
N C I
no response
Corendon Dutch
No
N C I
no response
Denim Air ACMI B.V.‎
No
N C I
no response
Jet Management Europe
No
N C I
KLM
Partly
N C I
Special air services
No
N C I
no eggs
Transavia
No
N C I
Tarom
No
N C I
Virgin Atlantic
Partly
N C I
Ryanair
No
N C I
no response
Easy Jet
No
N C I
no response
British Airways
Partly
N C I
Alaska Airlines
No
N C I
American Airlines
No
N C I
no response
Delta Air Lines
Partly
N C I
Frontier Airlines
No
N C I
no eggs
Hawaiian Airlines
No
N C I
no response
JetBlue Airlines
No
N C I
Skywest Airlines
No
N C I
no response
Southwest Airlines
No
N C I
no eggs
Spirit Airlines
No
N C I
no response
Sun Country Airlines
No
N C I
no response
United Airlines
Partly
N C I
Virgin America
Yes
N C I
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tierschutz aspekte huhn

ANIMAL WELFARE ISSUES

The daily lives of laying hens:

Most laying hens in Europe and the US live in cages. In Europe, the majority of laying hens live in so-called “enriched cages.” A typical laying hen kept in an enriched cage in Europe shares her cage with 20 to 60 other laying hens (depending on the size of the overall compartment). Perches, nesting boxes, and scratching areas are installed to provide an enriched environment – but considering the confined space hens are hardly able to benefit from these additions. In a battery cage, hens spend their entire lives in a barren wire cage, with each hen having little more than the size of an A4 sheet of paper (or slightly more than the size of an iPad) worth of individual space to move around in.

In 2014, approximately 26% of European laying hens were kept in barn systems, while 14% were kept in free-range systems. Only 4% of European laying hens are kept on organic farms. In the US, more than 90% of the 270 million egg-laying hens are kept in battery cages. In 2015, only 6.4% of US hens are kept in a non-cage keeping system: 3.2% on organic farms and 3.2% in a cage-free keeping system. Unfortunately, in both Europe and the US there is no plan yet to ban the cage-keeping of laying hens.

However, thanks to a labelling requirement for fresh eggs, consumers in Europe are provided with proper information on fresh eggs. The label tells them if the eggs come from cage, barn, free-range, or organic keeping systems so that consumers can make an informed decision. Yet, this is not the case for eggs in sauces, spreads, baked goods, or sweets, which is where the majority of cage eggs are being used. In the US, in the absence of labelling requirements it is up to companies to voluntarily decide whether to label fresh or processed eggs. And even then there are no clear and firm standards for what each individual label means unless the company chooses to be audited and certified by a third-party. In the end, this is not sufficient as consumers have the right to know how laying hens are kept when their eggs are used in fresh and processed foods.

Naturally all husbandry systems are as good as the management. Also in free range and organic systems animal welfare problems can occur when the animals are not properly cared for.

Fact is that, irrespective of the husbandry system, nowadays, egg production is tailored towards economic efficiency. This can have negative consequences on animal welfare. In industrialized keeping systems, high stocking densities and herd sizes (hundreds to thousands birds) are common. Male chicks, the male brothers of laying hens, are killed on the very first day of life as they are considered an unwanted by-product. This is linked to the fact that laying hens are bred for high egg yield, which corresponds to less meat growth for their male counterparts. Economically, fattening the males is not profitable enough and therefore leads to male chicks being disposed of. However, also laying hens are ultimately treated according to their productivity and are only used for around a year before they are slaughtered at the age of 18 months after only one laying cycle. As with all farm animals, surgical procedures, are carried out with hens: beak trimming is commonly carried out to prevent feather picking and cannibalism at a later stage (this procedure is not routinely allowed on organic farms). Feather picking as well as cannibalism are symptoms of keeping conditions that do not meet the needs of the animals. These abnormal behavioral patterns can occur in small herds as well – signifying that animal welfare issues can arise regardless of management systems. It is important to keep in mind that a hen is more than an egg laying machine but rather a sentient being with complex behaviours and needs.

Every single person can contribute to higher animal welfare: reducing the consumption of products of animal origin or replacing those products with plant-based alternatives contributes to less animals being kept in bad conditions. If you are open for egg free alternatives, eggs can be replaced with bananas, soy flour and baking powder used as thickener.

FOUR PAWS demands a ban on all cage systems for egg-laying hens and mandatory labelling that states how all laying hens were kept when their eggs are used for fresh or processed foods.

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EVERY VOICE COUNTS!

Ask airlines to stop offering eggs from caged hens in their in-flight menus

 

Is the airlines you are flying serving meals that contain cage eggs?

Airlines travel different sets of routes and work with different catering companies that supply the in-flight meals. Airlines can go cage-free by asking their caterers to supply them with cage-free egg products. Switching to cage-free eggs will not happen overnight, but it can happen in stages. One option is for airlines to first ask the caterers they work with in the country where their national headquarters is based, followed by their suppliers on flights within the continent, ending with their caterers that supply their international flights.

More than 3 billion people fly somewhere every year. There are nearly a 100,000 flights per day globally and daily 8.6 million passengers are served a meal on board.

Every day in the U.S., airlines operate some 27,000 flights for over 2 million passengers. These numbers are only expected to grow. Imagine how many egg-laying hens’ lives are affected by the meal choices airlines make.When airlines switch to cage-free eggs they are speaking for and supporting keeping systems that give laying hens a better life. Ask airlines here to use only cage-free eggs.

Laying hens should be kept in cage-free systems and consumers should be able to access information about how laying hens are kept so that they can make an informed and more humane decision. Help Hannah Hen convince airlines to go cage-free and sign the petition today!

Sign the petition! Together we can convince your airline to go completely cage-free!
Help Hannah Hen accomplish her mission. Ask your airline to go cage-free!
Please fill out all fields marked with a *.
Data protection: Your email address will not be made public or given out to third parties!
already 4651 signatures
Goal 5000
 
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GET ACTIVE!

Help Hannah Hen accomplish her mission. Ask your airline to go cage-free!

Download your own Hannah hen and take a picture of her with your airline meal. Post it online on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter with the hashtag #eggcheck. Tag your airline and ask them to go cage-free!

DIY Hannah Hen

 


Tell your airline to use only cage-free eggs. Ask your flight attendant about the eggs used in their snacks and menus.

Use Hannah’s luggage tag on your suitcase. This way everyone you are flying with will become aware of the cage-free mission. Post a photo of your suitcase with the hashtag #eggcheck.

Luggage tag

 

 

Twitter: #eggcheck
More on Twitter
Instagram: #eggcheck
More on Instagram
VIER PFOTEN International
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Email: office@vier-pfoten.at , Tel: +43-1-895 02 02-0
Imprint

FOUR PAWS INTERNATIONAL


6 Beacon St #1110
Boston, MA 02108
e-mail: office@vier-pfoten.us
Tel: 001-(617) 942 - 1233

 

Disclaimer

FOUR PAWS undertook all reasonable efforts to make sure that all information that is made available on this website is correct and complete at the point it has been supplied. Nevertheless, there may be unintentional and coincidental errors for which we apologize.

We want to point out that we cannot give any guarantee for any of the data despite careful editing – neither the authors nor FOUR PAWS assume liability for any of its content.

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© 2015 www.vier-pfoten.org
All rights reserved – FOUR PAWS International, Vienna

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Austrian Airlines

Austrian Airlines informed FOUR PAWS that they plan to work with their caterers (Sky Gourmet) on a shift to cage-free eggs but could not provide a timeline for this shift. On European flights Austrian Airlines uses fresh eggs from Austrian barn keeping, in small amounts they also use organic free range eggs.100% cage-free eggs could not be guaranteed for pasteurized egg product so information on the sourcing of processed eggs was available (e.g. eggs in other products such as cookies.) In the absence of this information we will assume that if any pasteurized and processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Fly Niki

Fly Niki informed FOUR PAWS that on European flights they use fresh eggs from Austrian barn keeping. In small amounts they also use organic free range eggs. A100% guarantee could not be given for products that contain pasteurized eggs. No information on the sourcing of processed eggs was available (e.g. eggs in other products such as cookies). In the absence of this information we will assume that if any pasteurized and processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks, they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Air France

Air France has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are served in their in-flight meals they are likely from cage-eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Brussels Airlines

Brussels Airlines uses cage-eggs in their in-flight menus, as they have confirmed that they adhere to EU legislation which allows for cage-keeping of laying hens in enriched cage-systems.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Swiss

Swiss uses cage-free eggs for flights starting from Zürich. They did not provide any information for continental and intercontinental flights, therefore we can only assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used on those flights in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
checking
Edelweiss

Edelweiss uses cage-free eggs for flights starting from Switzerland. They contacted their suppliers to get more information for their continental and intercontinental flights.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Lufthansa

Lufthansa uses cage-free, barn kept (also partly free-range and organic eggs) in their in-flight menu on flights leaving Germany. This can only be guaranteed for Germany. Globally cage-free eggs cannot be guaranteed on flights due to the supply chain. Their caterer is LSG Sky Chefs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Germanwings

Germanwings uses cage-free, barn kept (also partly free-range and organic eggs) in their in-flight menu on flights leaving Germany. This can only be guaranteed for Germany. Globally cage-free eggs cannot be guaranteed on flights due to the supply chain. Their caterer is LSG Sky Chefs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Eurowings

Eurowings uses cage-free, barn kept (also partly free-range and organic eggs) in their in-flight menu on flights leaving Germany. This can only be guaranteed for Germany. Globally cage-free eggs cannot be guaranteed on flights due to the supply chain. Their caterer is LSG Sky Chefs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Condor

Condor uses barn eggs (also partly free-range and organic eggs)  in their in-flight menu for flights leaving Germany. This can only be guaranteed for Germany. Globally cage-free eggs cannot be guaranteed on flights due to the supply chain. Their caterer is LSG Sky Chefs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
TUIfly

TUIfly uses cage-free, barn kept eggs in their in-flight menu on flights leaving Germany. In the cookies, processed cage eggs are used. Their caterers are LSG Sky Chefs and SCK Sky Catering.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Air Berlin

Air Berlin claims they use cage-free barn kept eggs on all their flights. It is not clear if this refers to fresh eggs only or also to processed eggs. It is also not clear if they are 100% cage-free. Air Berlin could not confirm the latter statement in writing.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no eggs
Air Charters Europe

Air Charters Europe does not use any eggs as they do not serve in-flight meals.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no eggs
AIS Airlines

AIS Airlines does not use any eggs as they do not serve in-flight meals.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Arkefly TUI Niederlande

Arkefly TUI Nederlands has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Corendon Dutch

Corendon Dutsch Airlines has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Denim Air ACMI B.V.‎

Denim Air ACMI B.V. has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Jet Management Europe

Jet Management Europe uses an external catering service and claims it has no influence on the use of eggs in their meals. In our view airlines can always play a role in determining what products are sold on their flights. In light of the information provided to us, we will assume that the products sold on Jet Management flights are from cage-eggs, unless stated otherwise on the product labels.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
KLM

KLM is one of the top ranking airlines when it comes to using cage-free eggs. All KLM flights leaving Amsterdam or other European destinations are cage-free. On intercontinental flights, all business class meals from the US are cage-free. KLM communicates its animal welfare policy to its suppliers and is asking their other suppliers to provide animal-friendlier alternatives.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no eggs
Special air services

Special services BV does not serve eggs as they do not serve in-flight meals.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Transavia

Transavia stated that since they buy final products sold in the market, they cannot influence the sourcing of the ingredients they buy. In our view airlines can always play a role in determining what products are sold on their flights. In light of the information provided to us, we will assume that the products sold on Transavia flights contain cage-eggs (except for one product, an egg-mayonnaise salad, that does not contain cage-eggs).

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Tarom

Tarom could not issue an official response on the eggs used in their inflight meals, as the airlines’ future structure is not yet firmly established.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Virgin Atlantic

All their catering units that work for Virgin Atlantic in the US and Europe are expected to use cage-free eggs by the end of 2015. All additional international caterers that work with Virgin Atlantic will follow suit in 2016. Virgin Atlantic has an animal welfare policy that aims to eventually adhere to various organic standards in all continents.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Ryanair

Ryanair has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Easy Jet

Easy Jet has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
British Airways

British Airways has informed us that they use cage-free barn kept eggs or better whenever possible but that it is restricted by supply in different countries. It is not clear if they use 100% cage-free eggs on national or continental flights where cage-free supply should be sufficient. A response to this question has not been provided. It is also not clear whether British Airway plans to take further steps to fully shift to cage-free eggs on all flights.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Alaska Airlines

Alaska Airlines serves a liquid, cage egg product in select in-flight meals. However, they have asked their caterer to explore a cage-free alternative. Alaska Airlines will continue to discuss the possibility of going 100% cage-free in the future and will continue working with their caterers towards a sustainable long-term solution.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
American Airlines

American Airlines has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Delta Air Lines

Delta Airlines serves cage-free eggs to their first/business class passengers on all domestic flights, which accounts for 99% of meals served on domestic flights. For meals served on intercontinental flights, many of their suppliers – including their largest meal provider – use cage-free eggs, however, some other suppliers use cage eggs. Delta Airlines cannot currently commit to going 100% cage-free because of supply uncertainties and limitations, yet they are interested in pursuing that possibility in the future.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no eggs
Frontier Airlines

Frontier Airlines does not use any fresh or processed eggs in their in-flight meals.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Hawaiian Airlines

Hawaiian Airlines has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
JetBlue Airlines

JetBlue Airlines has one snack item, chocolate chip cookies, which is likely made with processed cage eggs. They also serve cage eggs in one of their in-flight meals offered on certain domestic flights.  However, due to the limited number of fresh meals they serve eggs are a very low volume item for them compared to other animal products they use. In their five-year strategy plan towards using more natural, organic, and local food items, they are presently focusing on animal welfare and sustainability issues for their highest volume animal products. And thanks to our inquiry they may now consider fresh cage-free eggs as part of their plan in 2017.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Skywest Airlines

Skywest Airlines has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no eggs
Southwest Airlines

Southwest Airlines does not provide in-flight meals, and the snacks they serve are not made with processed eggs. 

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Spirit Airlines

Spirit Airlines has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Status
no response
Sun Country Airlines

Sun Country Airlines has not responded to our inquiries nor provided information on the type of eggs used in their in-flight meals and snacks. In the absence of information we will assume that if any fresh eggs or processed eggs are used in their in-flight meals or snacks they are likely from cage eggs.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
United Airlines

United Airlines serves cage-free eggs to their first/business class passengers on flights within North America. For economy class passengers on many of the intercontinental flights departing from the U.S., they also use cage-free eggs in their egg dishes. The cage-free eggs are a combination of pasture-raised and free-range. They use liquid eggs at most locations worldwide. United Airlines cannot currently commit to or guarantee going 100% cage-free because of supply uncertainties and limitations. They continue to encourage suppliers to provide cage-free eggs for them when possible.

 
PROGRESS

N

C

I
Virgin America

Virgin America never responded to our letters, however, they have been quoted publically stating they exclusively serve cage-free eggs in their in-flight menu. They only fly within North America.